Category Archives: Josiah P. Ames

Josiah Parker Ames: Miramar Beach could have been named after him

Josiah Parker Ames By June Morrall The few clusters of Americans scattered in the bureaucratically named Department of California felt threatened on the brink of the U.S. war with Mexico in 1846. The settlers smelled invasion in the air. But … Continue reading

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Miramar Beach's Amesport & Judge Josiah P. Ames: Part V

(Photo: A rickety Amesport wharf some 60-70 years after it had been built at Miramar). The political star of Josiah Parker Ames was rising when he donated a new flag staff to the town of Half Moon Bay in 1876. … Continue reading

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Miramar Beach's Amesport & Judge Josiah P. Ames: Part IV

Josiah “JP” Ames had his finger in every sector of Half Moon Bay’s miniscule economy. He owned a flour mill where the grain was ground and cracked. In 1873, when 700 citizens lived in Half Moon Bay, the mill turned … Continue reading

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Miramar Beach's Amesport & Judge Josiah P. Ames: Part III

A creek running through the James Denniston property in Princeton–where the family reputedly resided in an adobe–was named Denniston Creek after its owner. Denniston operated Old Landing, the only wharf on the Coastside (where there were no natural harbors); little … Continue reading

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Miramar Beach's Amesport & Judge Josiah P. Ames: Part II

Born in England–but reared in New York City—Josiah P. Ames was 20 when he joined Col. Jonathan Stevenson’s special regiment that sailed around Cape Horn to California in 1847. The colonel’s instructions were to take part in the American occupation … Continue reading

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Miramar Beach's Amesport & Judge Josiah P. Ames: Part I

The few clusters of Americans scattered in the bureaucratically named “Department of California” felt threatened on the brink of the U.S. “war” with Mexico in 1846. The settlers smelled invasion in the air. But from whom? They weren’t certain. They … Continue reading

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